Management Training Courses

management trainingModern managers are expected to have the ability to think creatively on top of having the necessary analytical skills and decision making skills. Contemporary courses therefore try to develop and promote soft skills like team-work and social ability along with the necessary hard core management skills. A good manager must be excellent at managing people as well as activities.

Whether managing a large company or your own business, essential management skills can be learnt, refreshed, or up-dated; thanks to a number of different colleges and course providers. You can even choose to participate in a one-day training course in a particular area you feel you need guidance or information on.

The College of Management and IT (CMIT) offer a QQI accredited distance learning course that equips Managers (and those new to Management) with comprehensive skills to improve their organisational and people management abilities.
Students will learn how to:
• Organise company structures/teams
• Complete internal and external organisation reviews
• Effectively lead and manage staff
• Manage their time more effectively
• Learn how to be more organised as Managers.
The course is designed for those working in Large Companies, SMEs or the Public Sector.

The Communications and Management Institute (CMI) run an advanced Diploma in Management. They focus on effective management for the individual participating in the course according to their style.

Griffin College offer a number of specific occupational training courses which focus on topical and relevant issues in the work place. An example of one of these courses is ‘Conflict Handling and Resolution Skills’. This course recognises that if an organisation is to thrive, it must be able to handle conflict. Upon completion of the course, participants should understand the stages of conflict and gain knowledge and the skills necessary to put resolutions into place. They also offer courses relating to interviewing, managing stress and developing and sustaining vision, amongst others.

The Institute of Public Administration (IPA) offer a Postgraduate Diploma in Public Management. It is a one year part-time programme that analyses public management issues. This programme is suitable for anybody working in the public sector. This course is accredited by the National University of Ireland.

The Institute of Technology in Carlow offer a Bachelor of Business (honours) in management. This is a full-time four year course providing an academic qualification for those interested in a career in business and management. Its general nature provides students with a broad skill-base that will ensure that the graduate has a wide range of potential job opportunities.

There is no shortage of courses if this is the area you wish to specialise in. It is important to remember that most career areas require a certain level of management ability, whether it is self-management or managing others. Undertaking a management course also serves to improve your general employability or productivity.

Good management is essential to any successful organisation. A good leader achieves a hard working, productive and effective workforce that punches above its weight in its performance. A reflective and creative manager is a skilful administrator who is constantly looking for ways to not just improve productivity from staff, but one who seeks to acquire new knowledge, so that decisions made are informed ones, and issues are handled with credibility. Therefore, whatever management course you choose to participate in, try to ensure that the course content and philosophy reflects changing trends and will set you on the road to effective and productive leadership.

View Management Training Courses on Findacourse.ie at www.findacourse.ie/management-courses-c25.html

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Traineeship Information

traineeships in IrelandThe government has recently committed to doubling the number of trainees enrolled by 2020 and to significantly expanding the number of industries offering traineeship programmes. Budget 2018 allocated an additional €15m for traineeship training which represents an increase of almost 58% on the 2017 allocation of €26m.

Traineeships are programmes of structured training which combines learning in an education and training setting and in the workplace aiming to improve recruitment and employment outcomes for participants and increase retention and productivity within industry. Previously aimed at unemployed people, traineeships are now open to a wider range of participants, of all ages and background.

Key features of Traineeships in Ireland

  • They respond to an identified industry skills need
  • Lead to an award at NFQ Levels 4-6, or equivalent
  • Are between 6-20 months in duration
  • Have at least 30% of learning on-the-job
  • Combine transversal and technical skills development
  • Are designed for flexible delivery – online, blended learning
  • Provide open access to prospective trainees, unemployed people may be eligible for income support

Currently, there are over 30 traineeship programmes available around the country. This number will increase with the development of more traineeships across a range of industries and sectors.

The below list sets out the suite of current traineeship programmes.

  • Aircraft Maintenance Technician
  • Aircraft Structures Technician
  • Engineering
  • Laboratory Assistant
  • IT Support Specialist
  • Software Developer
  • Digital Sales and Marketing
  • IT Network Security
  • Animation Studio Assistant

CARE HOSPITALITY

  • Early Childhood Care and Education
  • Health Care Assistant
  • Hospitality NFQ Level 4
  • Hospitality NFQ Level 5
  • Food and Beverage Service

CONSTRUCTION LOGISTICS

  • Overhead Lines Operator
  • Interior Systems
  • Supply Chain Logistics
  • Logistics and Distribution

BUSINESS RETAIL

  • Office Administration
  • Business Systems Service Technician
  • Business Administration
  • Medical Administration
  • Legal Administration
  • Retail Associate
  • Pharmacy Sales Assistant
  • Retail Skills Health and Beauty

SPORTS AND LEISURE FASHION AND BEAUTY

  • Outdoor Activity Instructor
  • Equestrian International Instructor (BHSAI)
  • Sports, Recreation and Exercise
  • Beauty Therapist

FINANCE

  • Accounts Executive
  • Financial Administration

Eligibility

Traineeships are free of charge to participants. Trainees may include school leavers, older learners, those in employment and those who are unemployed. The minimum age for participation on a Traineeship programme is the statutory school leaving age of 16 years.

People who are unemployed and wish, following engagement with their Intreo Case Officer, to access traineeship to upskill for employment, may be eligible for a training allowance or income support.

As of November 2017, eligibility and support to participate in a traineeship has been expanded. In line with the Pathways to Work 2016-2020 strategy, the Comprehensive Framework for Employment of People with Disabilities and the Action Plan on Jobless Households, eligibility to participate in a traineeship now includes unemployed people who are in receipt of the following payments:

  • Jobseekers Benefit
  • Jobseekers Payment
  • One Parent Family payment
  • Jobseeker’s Transitional Payment (JST)
  • Disability Allowance

Eligible persons must also be resident in the state and hold a valid PPSN.
Those in receipt of one of the payments above are eligible to retain their payment while participating in a traineeship. Prospective participants who fulfil these criteria are referred by Department of Education and Social Protection (D/EASP) to an Education Training Board (ETB) and receive a training allowance for the duration of their training.

More Information

Intreo offices (www.welfare.ie), Local Employment Services (www.localemploymentservices.ie) and Education and Training Boards (www.etbi.ie) provide a guidance service locally and regionally to jobseekers and adult learners.

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STEM Education Subjects To Be Prioritised

The Minister for Education and Skills, Richard Bruton, T.D. has launched his Department’s STEM Education Policy Statement 2017-2026 and Implementation Plan 2017-2019. In line with the objective to be the best in Europe, the plan being published today sets out the Minister’s intention to make Ireland a European leader in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) education by 2026.

Speaking at the Launch, Minister Bruton said “We are undergoing a technological revolution globally. If Ireland is to be at the forefront of this transformation, we must be a leader in nurturing, developing and deploying STEM talent. This Policy Statement focusses on the many strengths in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education in Ireland while providing a roadmap to address the areas for development”.

Key ambitions include:

  • Increase by 20% the total students taking Chemistry, Physics, Technology and Engineering for Leaving Certificate
  • Increase by 40% the number of females taking STEM subjects for Leaving Certificate
  • Increase participation in out-of-school STEM learning opportunities and STEM career activities
  • Introduce a new primary maths curriculum, which will include creative and computational thinking and coding
  • Accelerate the introduction of Computer Science at Leaving Certificate, with implementation brought forward to September 2018
  • Introduction of new Junior Cycle Mathematics and Technology curricula
  • Teachers will use a cross-disciplinary approach to incorporating STEM across all subjects
  • Enhance STEM teaching, learning and assessment practices in early years settings
  • Close the gap in achievement in STEM disciplines between students in DEIS schools and students in all schools significantly
  • Ensure that all schools, learners and parents have access to high quality information on the diversity of STEM careers
  • Build robust and sustainable partnerships between schools, business and industry, public sector bodies, research organisations, further and higher-level institutions and the Arts

Achieving these goals will require a significant step-up in support to teachers and school leaders and encouragement of innovation in teaching methods.

Actions to deliver on these ambitions will be included in the annual programme under the Action Plan for Education and their impact will be reported on.

The policy statement document can be viewed at the following link – https://www.education.ie/en/The-Education-System/STEM-Education-Policy/stem-education-policy-statement-2017-2019.pdf

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Effective Study Habits

study techniquesWith seasonal exams fast approaching, it’s good to make the most of the time put aside for study by putting in place some techniques and routines. Effective study habits are very important for achieving satisfactory exam results. They help to store information in long-term memory. Applying the following rules for studying should help in improving exam results.

Study Tips

1. Keep the area around your desk neat and tidy. If possible, the area should also be quiet. If you are having trouble finding a quiet place to study, try the local library or park. The library is a perfect place to have peace and quiet. The park may not be as quiet, but the fresh air can make studying less nerve-racking. If noise is unavoidable, then try listening to some relaxing music while studying.

2. Sit down for 45 minute intervals, followed by 15 minute breaks. Having an easily attainable goal, like sitting for set duration of time, is effective for increasing motivation.

3. Reward yourself if and only if you have met your goal for that study session. For example, if you plan to study one chapter and succeed, then you may reward yourself. Examples of positive reinforcement are: food, exercise, video-games, etc.

4. Have a scheduled study time for each school day. Remember that one classroom hour should be reinforced by two hours of studying at home.

5. Make correspondences between your class notes and your textbook. This will help you to fill in any background information not covered in class.

6. Prepare questions about the chapter that will be discussed in the following class. This will help you identify areas that you don’t understand.

7. Put any new words or concepts to use. The more you use the learned information, the more likely you will be to remember it. This is especially true for language classes.

8. Finally, review what you have studied just before you go to bed. You will find that you will remember the words very strongly the next morning.

Study Tips, Exam Tips

Study Downfalls

1. Procrastination. Cramming is not beneficial for producing long term memory.

2. Studying on the computer. You are bound to be tempted to check your email or surf the net. Studies also show that people skim over information more on computer screens, which does not effectively log the information in memory.

3. Leaving mobile phones on during study time. No matter who is calling or texting, usually it can wait 45 minutes. Having your cell phone on silent mode during study time can help remove distractions.

4. Study just after having eaten. Studies have shown that thinking is slower after having a meal.

5. Spacing out. When you feel your mind begin to wander, remind yourself to concentrate. If you are reading, using a pencil or pointer is a good way to keep your mind on track. Even moving your finger on the page forces you to pay more attention to what you are doing.

Of course studying and memorising are 2 different things. If you read something once it is likely that it will not remain in memory for long. It is usually necessary to go over notes between 2 and 7 times before they will become logged in longer term memory. It is also important to break up information so that the brain does not become overloaded. It may be worthwhile reading up on some memorisation techniques available online to be sure that your study time is being used effectively. One such resource is available at http://www.wikihow.com/Memorize.

Remember also, if there are parts of the course that you don’t understand or need help with, not to be afraid to get in contact with a course tutor, after all that’s what they’re there for. Most often they will be glad to see that students are making an effort and are trying to learn and will be happy to help with any parts of the course that are causing difficulty.

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Converting College Courses

Converting college coursesHave you ever wanted to convert your degree into something else? Have you ever wanted to specialise in a specific area of interest? Do you want to equip yourself with the necessary skills and qualifications that are currently in short supply? If you have answered yes to any of these questions, conversion courses could be the perfect fit for you to fulfil personal or professional ambitions.

The good news is that your existing undergraduate degree is not defunct; in fact it is the necessary foundation to allow you to gain access to a conversion programme of study. These courses are usually one-year taught postgraduate courses with a range of subject areas to choose from. Employers put a lot of weight on these courses as they are evidence of your ability and motivation to move with the changing economic forces currently at play in today’s jobs market.  A conversion course is the ideal way to address your lack of current skills, broaden your knowledge, or to progress further in your current career.

As with any course it is important to check with the individual HEI to ascertain the minimum entry requirements. Usually, the minimum requirement is a degree; the more competitive courses will require an honours degree of 2:1. Most conversion courses are open to graduates from any discipline, and this is the main advantage of undertaking a conversion course. However, there are certain programmes that will require specific subjects or specific undergraduate degrees.

There are a number of areas that are proving to be extremely popular at the moment; IT and Medicine being an example of these. In relation to IT, students do report how easy it was to convert to this area. IT conversion courses welcome students with degrees in unrelated disciplines, and other applicants with relevant experience who are looking to up-skill. Given the current shortage of IT graduates, it is little surprise to hear of the demand and interest for related courses. Participants who complete these types of conversion courses will have gained theory and practice in one year comparable to the level of competence of a computer science graduate.

Medicine is an area that was made inaccessible to those who failed to make the exorbitant points as leaving certificate applicants. The much welcome news is that The Graduate Entry Medical School at the University of Limerick and The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland both offer a four-year medical degree programme to graduates of any discipline. These four year programmes are not the typical conversion courses but they also do not require their students to have studied medicine at undergraduate level. Applicants must hold a minimum 2:1 bachelor honours degree and then pass the GAMSAT (Graduate Australian Medical Schools Admissions Test) to be accepted.

Before considering whether to undertake a conversion qualification, it is recommended to research thoroughly the area/discipline you are considering going into and speak to the individual HEIs in question. The obvious criteria would be:

  • Do I have a real interest and aptitude/ability for this area?
  • What are the career opportunities after graduation?
  • What percentage of graduates get employment from this course?
  • What will it cost me?

An example of an innovative and exciting conversion programme is the Master of Arts in Technology, Learning, Innovation and Change on offer from Saint Angela’s in Sligo. This is a one year full-time professional development programme which aims to equip individuals with the knowledge, skills and understanding necessary to utilise technology in an innovative way to enhance practices at the level of the individual and/or organisation.

This course is part-funded by the HEA under the Graduate Skills Conversion Programme 2011-2012 (NDP 2007-2013) and it consists of four College based modules and a ten-week workplace practicum:

• Module 1: Innovation and changing practices: contemporary debates and issues.

• Module 2: Technology, innovation and changing practices

• Module 3:  Enhanced learning and research practices

• Module 4: Implementing the Innovative use of technology to enhance learning and facilitate change. (includes a ten week workplace practicum)

The HDipPsych Conversion programme from NUIG is a one-year, full-time programme designed for students who have completed the BA with Psychological Studies at NUI Galway, or its equivalent. By combining the HDipPsych (Conversion) with the BA with Psychological Studies, students will have covered the course content equivalent to that of the NUI Galway BA in Psychology programme, thus qualifying graduates for entry to postgraduate professional programmes in Ireland and in the United Kingdom. This is the idea course for anybody who failed to access a pure psychology degree course but who still wishes to pursue a career in this field.

They say that some of us will change our career up to six times in our lifetime; for some that will be out of personal choice but for the majority it will be a case of necessity. Whilst conversion courses can be the ideal way to follow that preferred career path denied to you at an earlier stage or perhaps you only realised your real career interests later in life; these courses are evidence of ‘it is never too late’ to change from one discipline to the other. In fact your current degree puts you at the starting line for further study in areas related to Education, law, IT business, Medicine, Social Work etc.

All HEIs in Ireland have Programmes funded under the Graduate Skills Conversion Programme 2012-13. You can contact the HEI of interest to find out about conversion courses and funding available to you.

Author:
Catriona Lowry

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Benefits of ITEC Qualification

itec certificationITEC is one of the world’s leading awarding bodies specialising in the fields of Sport and Fitness, Beauty, Complementary Therapy, Hairdressing and Customer Service. Founded in 1947, with its headquarters in London and offices in Asia and South Africa, ITEC also has representation in Ireland and the U.S. It is partnered with 655 colleges across the world and ITEC’s international specialist examination board provides high quality qualifications that are recognised worldwide.

In Ireland, ITEC is regulated by OfQual and all ITEC qualifications are in line with the European Qualifications Framework (EQF) and the National Qualifications Framework Ireland (NQAI). To make sure that the trainings are of high standard, ITEC has an independent panel of experts who review all policies, procedures and processes every three months. There is also a Senior Management team who meet monthly with beauty and hair experts whose expertise and experience helps to continually refine and improve courses. All of this means that a qualification from ITEC is certain to enhance a student’s CV and improve employability.

There are many ITEC qualifications on offer around the country:

Litton Lane Training have courses based in Dublin, Meath and Cork and run an ITEC level 3 Award in Nutrition for Physical Activity. This course is run on a part-time basis and is held over a course of evenings and weekends.

Portobello Institute offers an ITEC Nutrition Advisor course, an ITEC Beauty Specialist Certificate course, an ITEC Holistic Massage course and an ITEC Manicure and Pedicure Certificate to name but a few. All these courses are run on a part-time, evening basis with locations in Dublin, Carlow, Clare, Cork, Donegal, Galway, Kildare, Kilkenny, Louth, Meath, Sligo, Waterford, Westmeath, Wicklow and Wexford.

Haven Beauty Training in Westmeath is offering ITEC courses such as a Diploma in Holistic Massage, a Beauty Specialist Diploma, and a Diploma in Nail Technology; all run on an evening, part-time basis.

In Cork City, the College of Oriental Medicine runs an ITEC course in Anatomy and Physiology. It is a four day intensive course from 9am to 5pm.

In Dublin, Motions Health and Fitness Training offers an ITEC Certificate in Sports Massage Therapy over an eight month period on Wednesdays from 7pm to 10pm.

The Institute of Massage and Sports Therapy offers an ITEC Diploma in Diet and Nutrition in Galway, Limerick and Wexford. It takes place on alternate Saturdays between 10am and 4pm and applicants must have a recognised qualification in a complementary therapy if they wish to use the qualification professionally. If the course is for personal use then no prior knowledge or learning is needed.

So whether you want to learn a new specialist skill or update your CV, there is a range of ITEC qualifications available to suit anyone interested in working in the Health and Fitness and related sectors. With employment opportunities sparse these days, it’s all about making your CV stand out. An ITEC qualification can give you that extra feature that will be sure to catch an employer’s attention. As these qualifications are internationally recognised; completing an ITEC training course could also be the perfect passport for working abroad. Opportunities are plentiful when you are well qualified so be sure to check out an ITEC course near you.

Resources
• Fitness Training Courses on Findacourse.ie
• Beauty Training Courses on Findacourse.ie

Author
Fiona McBennett

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Bronwyn Conroy Beauty School Establishes Cork Location

Bronwyn Conroy Beauty School CorkBronwyn Conroy International Beauty School, Ireland’s premier school for beauty and skin-care courses, have now added Cork as a new Centre of Excellence for their CIBTAC & ITEC Courses. Bronwyn Conroy International Beauty School is a leading private Beauty School providing beauty therapy courses in Ireland for over 45 years.

On completion of the courses, students are fully prepared and armed with the knowledge and expertise to become leading beauty therapists and make-up artists in what has become a multi million euro beauty industry. Courses include training with Dermalogia, Environ skin care brand for all students. Bronwyn Conroy International Beauty School have expanded their range of beauty courses to specialize in areas of Advanced Skin Care, Laser and IPL as well as all the latest treatments new to the Beauty Industry.

The new Cork location on Pembroke Street will offer an expanding range of courses, similar to those on offer in Dublin. The first round of courses to be offered are shown below..

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Facial Skincare Certificate Level 2

Gain a qualification with CIBTAC & ITEC as a Skincare Specialist. This is a Level 2 course which will be the foundation of knowledge required to start a career in the Beauty Therapy & Skincare Industry.16 weeks, Saturday 10 – 4 or Monday 10 – 4

Level 4 Certificate in Education and Training

Especially suited to qualified Beauty Therapists, Hairdressers, Barbers, Nail Technicians, Make-up Artists and Qualified Beauticians who wish to start to move to a career as a Tutor or Beauty Teacher. 8 Sunday’s over 7 Months

Microblading Perfect Brows

Microblading is the latest technique within the permanent make-up industry. Bronwyn Conroy Eyebrow Microblading Course teaches this semi-permanent procedure which can last up to 2 years. Hair strokes are strategically placed between the epidermal and dermal layer of the skin for a technique more superficial than Tattooing. 4 days with 5th day for Assessment

ITEC Level 3 Holistic Massage

Gain a qualification in Body Massage in only 16 weeks , one day per week , Saturday or Monday. As the only School in Ireland certified to offer Lava Shell Massage , we include this treatment with all of our Holistic Massage Courses. This course when combined with the Facial Skincare course offers career opportunities in many Hotels and Spa’s throughout Ireland.

For more details about Bronwyn Conroy International Beauty School, view their course listings on Findacourse.ie – https://www.findacourse.ie/bronwyn-conroy-beauty-cg544.html

The Bronwyn Conroy International Beauty School website can be viewed at https://www.bronwynconroy.com/

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Student Assistance Fund

The Student Assistance Fund provides financial assistance for students in higher education who are experiencing financial difficulties whilst attending college.

Students can apply for Student Assistance to help them with either temporary or ongoing financial difficulties. The Student Assistance Fund provides a further source of funding for higher education students in addition to the Student Grant.

Each year, the State allocates a certain amount of Student Assistance funding to all approved higher education colleges based on the size of the college’s full-time student population. Students in need of financial support can then make application in the college for assistance under the Fund. The Student Assistance Fund is not available in further education/PLC colleges.

To find out whether you may be eligible for the Fund you need to be aware of the main conditions of the programme. The information below will assist you in this process. Each section below will guide you through the eligibility requirements of the fund.

The Student Assistance Fund is co-funded by the Irish Government and the European Social Fund as part of the ESF Programme for Employability, Inclusion and Learning (PEIL) 2014 – 2020’.

The following higher education colleges operate a Student Assistance Fund for eligible students. Most participating colleges have further information on their website on the operation of the Student Assistance Fund at local level.

Dublin City University
Maynooth University
National University of Ireland, Galway
Trinity College Dublin
University College Cork
University College Dublin
University of Limerick
Athlone Institute of Technology
Cork Institute of Technology
Dublin Institute of Technology
Dundalk Institute of Technology
Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology
Galway Mayo Institute of Technology
Institute of Technology Blanchardstown
Institute of Technology Carlow
Institute of Technology Sligo
Institute of Technology Tallaght
Institute of Technology Tralee
Letterkenny Institute of Technology
Limerick Institute of Technology
Waterford Institute of Technology
Church of Ireland College of Education
Marino Institute of Education
Mary Immaculate College
National College of Art and Design
National College of Ireland
St Patrick’s College Maynooth
Royal College of Surgeons Ireland
St Angela’s College

Eligibility

In order to be eligible to apply for student assistance funding a student must be:

Participating in a course in a university, institute of technology or other approved college.
Registered on

  • a full-time course, of not less than one year in duration, leading to a higher education award at level 6-10 of the national framework of qualifications

or

  • a part-time course leading to a higher education award at level 6-10 of the national framework of qualifications

Student must not be pursuing a second qualification at the same or a lower level.

Eligible Expenses
The Student Assistance Fund typically provides financial assistance to students who are having difficulty covering the following kinds of expenses:

Books
Class materials
Rent
Heating/lighting bills
Food
Travel of an urgent or essential nature
Medical expenses, i.e. doctor or dental visits
Expenses associated with family breakdown
Expenses associated with bereavement
Expenses associated with accidents
Childcare
Compulsory study abroad
(This is not a definitive list)

Students requiring financial assistance to help with tuition fees or registration fees cannot be considered under the Student Assistance Fund.

Application
Currently, each participating institution decides how the Student Assistance Fund will be operated at local level, within the overall guidelines set by the Department of Education and Skills. The application process may vary therefore between participating institutions.

All colleges have an application form which must be completed by students wishing to apply for Student Assistance.

Applicants may be required to attend a meeting with a member of the college staff to discuss the application. Applicants may also be required to provide documentation to verify details of the income and outgoings provided in the application.

In general, due to demand for Student Assistance, participating colleges are not able to approve all applications they receive. Likewise, participating colleges may not be able to award all the funding being sought by successful applicants. The Department of Education and Skills requires colleges to target the Student Assistance Fund at those students most in need of financial support. This may mean, for example, that priority is given to applicants who are in receipt of a maintenance grant, this being an indicator of limited means. In 2017, additional funding has been allocated to SAF for the support of part-time students who are lone parents or members of the other access target groups.

Further Information

Student services or Access staff in participating institutions can provide further information on the fund. Lastly, the list of participating colleges provided earlier in this section has web links to further information on institutions’ websites.

http://hea.ie/funding-governance-performance/funding/student-finance/student-assistance-fund/

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Lifelong Learning Conference, December 2017

Lifelong Learning Conference, LimerickHELLIN (Higher Education Lifelong Learning Ireland Network) is a consortium of Irish Universities and Institutes of Technology who work together collaboratively to promote and advance Lifelong Learning and Continuing and Professional Education for adults within Universities, Institutes of Technology and other relevant bodies throughout the island of Ireland.

The organisation are currently promoting an upcoming conference programme, which will include presentations on a series of key themes in lifelong learning including:

  • Technology Enhanced Lifelong Learning
  • Meeting the Challenges of Lifelong Learning: Policy, Institutional and Personal
  • Relevance of Lifelong Learning to Personal and Professional Development
  • Recognition of Prior Learning
  • Employer Engagement in Lifelong Learning

The conference is suitable for practitioners, educators and researchers in the field of adult learning, and will also be of interest to students who are currently adult learners themselves.

Prices
Register for the early bird rate of €65.
Late Registrations will be €90.
Student rate of €15 is also available.

Register today at: http://hellin.ie/upcoming-conferences/

4th Annual HELLIN Conference
Theme: Enabling Lifelong Learning
December 8th 2017- University of Limerick

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Community Education

Community Education IrelandCommunity Education refers to adult education and learning, generally outside the formal education sector, which aims to enhance learning, empower people and contribute to society. It is a distinctive element of the adult education sector in Ireland  and has the capacity to reach marginalised people in disadvantaged communities.

The community education sector grew out of the established Vocational Education Committee (VEC) adult education classes and adult literacy movement of the 1970s and 1980s. VECs have now been superceded by ETBs (Education and Training Boards).

What is community education?
Community education promotes personalised learning and flexibility within the learning group. Participants are involved as equal partners in identifying needs, designing and implementing programmes, and adapting them on an ongoing basis.

The goals of the community education sector include not just individual development but also community advancement, especially in marginalised communities. It allows participants to challenge existing structures and enables and encourages them to influence the society in which they live.

A key feature of community education programmes is that they provide the supports necessary for successful access and learning, particularly guidance, mentoring, continuous feedback and childcare.

Community Education Initiatives
Groups such as Travellers and other ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, rural smallholders, men’s groups, community arts groups and older people have made positive use of the community education on offer in their area. Women’s groups, in particular, spearheaded the development of the community education sector in the 1980s. One example was the NOW (New Opportunities for Women) programme which was funded by the EU Employment Initiative.

Community Education Facilitators
Community Education Facilitators work within the ETBs to give support to local community groups. This includes giving technical/administrative help, supporting the development, maintenance, and co-ordination of community education groups and strengthening links between the formal and non-formal education sectors. They assist and support the development of new community-based educational initiatives. The Community Education Facilitators Association is their professional organisation.

Back to Education Initiative
The Back to Education Initiative (BTEI) is one of the key pillars of the White Paper on Adult Education. It provides opportunities for second-chance education to adult learners and early school-leavers who want to upgrade their skills. The initiative allows learners to combine education with family, caring or work responsibilities. It builds on existing schemes such as Youthreach, VTOS, adult literacy schemes, community education and PLC courses. Ten per cent of the places allocated under these schemes are reserved for the community education sector, with the remainder of places being allocated to the statutory sector providers. Those taking part in schemes under the Back to Education Initiative may be eligible for the Back to Education Allowance.

Role of ETBs (formerly VECs) in community education
• The Community Education Services operate within the ETBs and give support services to community groups who are interested in community education as follows:
• Community Education Facilitators provide assistance and support to new or existing community education groups. They provide information on sources of funding and helps community education interests to access funding.
• Course development: Assistance is also available for community education groups to develop their own educational programmes and courses. This back up may include technical, administrative or educational input.
• Networking: Networking with other groups and organisations with an interest in community education, and sharing good practice from other sectors.

Accreditation and qualifications
Community education courses generally use a combination of different types of assessment methods such as assignments, projects, learners’ records, observations, skills demonstration and examinations. Accreditation has always posed challenges to non-formal education providers as it is not always a goal or a necessary outcome for all learners. However, the validity of learning in both the formal and non-formal environment has been recognised and worked into the National Framework of Qualifications. This Framework was developed by the National Qualifications Authority and creates a single system against which all learning can be mapped. It allows for learners to move from non-formal into formal education, from basic to further education, and from further into higher education in a relatively straightforward way.

How to apply

For more details about community education courses in your area, you should contact your local ETB (www.etb.ie) or AONTAS (www.aontas.com)
The BTEI application form and guidelines as well as a list of frequently asked questions are available on the website of the Department of Education and Skills (www.education.ie).

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Fashion Styling Courses

fashion styling coursesIt is easy to forget how important individual design is. How we dress ourselves and present ourselves to the world is almost as important as how we talk and what we say. Love it or hate it, fashion is part of how we express ourselves. Now wanting to dress the part is one thing, but following the fashion industry and understanding ramifications of individual fashion choices is entirely another thing. This is where a fashion stylist comes in.

A fashion stylist is, first and foremost, interested in fashion. Knowing individual designers’ collections, reading fashion magazines, attending fashion shows, understanding how clothes are made and the affect and consequences of different fabrics and colours are all components of a fashion stylist’s job.

On top of knowing about fashion, stylists apply their knowledge. When putting together a look, fashion stylists consider a number of factors, including colour and knowing what clothes will flatter particular personalities and body type, and all the time hiding flaws and enhancing strengths. Everyone wants to stand out in the crowd and so originality and creativity is incredibly important in this competitive job.

With the glamour and image industries booming, there are many opportunities for stylists in a wide range of areas. Some stylists concentrate on image consultation or personal shopping, others work predominantly in film and television styling actors, or photography styling models for photo shoots for catalogues, magazines, newspapers, or websites. They may also work with designers or public relations experts to celebrity and red carpet event styling.

Like many creative jobs, it can take some time to earn a good living from the work. Many start out with unpaid internships assisting an already established fashion stylist to gain experience and meet people in the industry. Fashion styling is very competitive and certification will most definitely help open doors. A fashion styling course is an excellent introduction to the industry and offers a strong foundation and understanding of the industry, providing support and career focused assistance.

Many courses on offer are practical and examine the ways in which colour, make-up, skincare, and clothing styles combine to make or break a person’s look. In addition, how to style for different body shapes and taking in to consideration personality and lifestyle are all basic features of any course. Other courses offer a wider perspective focusing on current and historical trends, specific designers, and the global fashion industry calendar. Some courses also include a focus on styling as a career and discuss business strategies on how to build your career and business.

The Colour and Image Academy in Cork and Limerick offers training in image consultancy including fashion styling for men and women, colour consultancy, and make-up application. Courses can be taken as one-offs or with the intention of building a career in image consulting.

CMI College in Dublin offer courses in Fashion Buying and Merchandising, one of these is accredited by QQI at level 5.

Portobello Institute offer a range of courses in the area of fashion styling, including their Fashion Buying and Merchandising full time course and an advanced certificate in fashion design.

Bronwyn Conroy offers a 5 day fashion consultancy course which runs in many locations around the country.

Courses in Fashion styling offer an introduction to a creative and artistic career, so if you think this might be for you why not check out the Style and Fashion courses on offer on Findacourse.ie – www.findacourse.ie/style-fashion-courses-c41.html

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Mid Term Taster Days with IADT

The Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art Design and Technology have announced a range of workshops from 31st October – 2nd November at the IADT Campus in Kill Avenue, Dun Laoghaire. These workshops are primarily aimed at CAO 2018 applicants (including mature students and PLC students), however 4th and 5th year students are also welcome to attend. These workshops allow prospective students to experience a taste of the courses on offer at IADT.

Students take part and learn about the subjects in a friendly and welcoming atmosphere. Students can book a place on a range of workshops including Art, Applied Psychology, Creative Computing and Creative Media Technologies, more details about the workshops are included below..

taster days IADT

For further information and bookings please visit http://www.iadt.ie/news/taster-days-31st-october-2nd-november

View IADT Courses page on Findacourse.ie

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A Career in Childcare

childacre courses in IrelandThe demand for high quality childcare continues to increase in Ireland and as a graduate in this sector – you are entering a flexible career with a wide range of placements to choose from.

A level 5 QQI award in Childcare could gain you employment in creches, nurseries, playgroups, early start programmes or as a classroom assistant in a special school. Of course your award can also be used as an educational passport to progress further in your career and travel up the national framework of qualifications or it can be converted into points which will allow you to apply for any number of courses in non-childcare disciplines in third level institutions. (see www.qqi.ie for further information).

If you choose to specialise in an area like Montessori Education – you are broadening the age groups you can work with.  As a graduate in Montessori you can work with children aged 3-6 and 6-9 inclusively. The Montessori Education Higher Certificate in Arts course provides students with the relevant knowledge and skills to empower them to make a significant contribution within the highly acclaimed Montessori sector. The Montessori College AMI (Association Montessori Internationale) offers a full time three year course. At the end of year 3 you can work with children up to 12 years of age. This course is recognised by the Department of Education and Science for teaching in special primary schools for children with disabilities, as is the BA in Montessori Education in St Nicholas’s Montessori College in Dun Laoghaire.

Portobello Institute also offers a number of different courses including certificate and diploma options with regard to Montessori training. It is important to note that this specialised area of childhood education continues to grow in Ireland. With experience, many teachers set up their own schools, and there are good opportunities for trained Montessori teachers in the rest of Europe and the USA.
childcare courses in Ireland
Throughout their career, childcare and Early Years workers can undertake work-based vocational and professional qualifications and go on to do part-time or full-time degrees. With appropriate training and qualifications staff can become supervisors, managers, open their own business or become Early Years Specialists. Therefore the idea of progressing further in the field you are passionate about is always an attractive option professionally and financially.

NUI Galway’s Early Childhood Studies and Practice degree course offers the student an extensive range of topics to study – ensuring the graduate will be skilled in a wide range of issues and areas that could see them employed in community and outreach settings to family and community resource centres or even in the policy development area. Graduates of this course may even progress further to higher diplomas or master degrees in Early Childhood Care and Education, Community Development and Family Studies and Support.

An example of a progression route would be if a graduate of a 1 year course in Early Childhood and Education course went on to apply for and complete a BA Degree in Applied Social Studies and Social Care. Immediately career opportunities as a graduate expand and arise in the voluntary, statutory and private sectors – in areas such as health care, residential childcare, special education and judicial services.

A variety of opportunities also exist to work with disabled persons, children, adolescents and older people in residential care, in day care and in the community. The BA in Applied Social Studies in Social Care is the nationally recognised qualification for working as a Social Care professional. Other related courses available in higher education to progress to include: Social Science, Psychology, Social and Community Development and other related disciplines.

As a childcare graduate you should be able to find a job that suits your own circumstances, stage of life and work experience. You can work full-time or part-time to suit your family or other commitments. Whatever area of the workforce you choose, you will be doing a job that makes a difference to the quality of life for children, young people and their families.

To see a wide range of childcare courses on offer around Ireland, use the following link – www.findacourse.ie/childcare-courses-c26.html

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National Learning Network

free courses for unemployedHave you been out of work for over 6 months, and need skills training to get back into employment?
National Learning Network provides a variety of certified training courses in over 50 locations in Ireland, for people who are unemployed and need skills training to get back to work. Jobseekers benefits and allowances are not affected by participating in any of these courses.

What are the benefits of NLN training courses?:

  • Closely aligned to the Irish labour market, they give practical skills and experience to trainees
  • They offer nationally recognised  FETAC, ECDL and City & Guilds qualifications
    They are FREE, with Jobseekers able to keep their allowances and benefits for the duration of the course
  • They offer one-to-one training support, career guidance and advice and personal development modules to help build learners confidence and provide them with the practical skills they need to apply for jobs and succeed at interviews.

NLN Training Courses are designed for jobseekers:

  • Full-time duration lasting 12-24 months, allowing you to finish at your own pace
  • Work placement – choose the industry you want to work in.  The Employer Based Training courses combine practical on-the-job training with in-centre learning to improve your chances of getting a job when you finish the course
  • NLN offer a range of training options, In-centre training, blended learning:  learning in a training centre combined with training in a learner’s local community, online training from the home or skills training in a work environment
  • Courses include modules on CV development and writing cover letters, applying for jobs, securing and successfully completing interviews.   Instructors will guide you on how to find jobs that suit your skill set and help you apply for jobs.

Do you need extra support with learning? NLN offers:
Learning supports: a dedicated key worker to support you, literacy and numeracy skills training, basic I.T.  skills training, are available to all students who require extra supports
Job seeking skills training: CV development, interview skills training, job search methods, support to find suitable further education and training options
Removal of barriers to learning:  offering advice and help on how to access allowances and support agencies in your local area such as community welfare groups, you local Intreo office, medical supports, transport links etc.  Courses are flexible, allowing you to make necessary appointments.

Certified Courses available: Art, Craft and Media, Business Studies, Computers and IT, Catering and Culinary Skills, Tourism & Hospitality, Sport & Leisure , Horticulture and Environment, Career Exploration and Employment.
National Learning Network provides training and specialist support to people who, for a variety of reasons, may find it difficult to gain employment. Whatever your circumstances – whether you are long term unemployed, have an illness or a disability – National Learning Network can help you.
As Ireland’s largest non-governmental education and training organisation, NLN offer over 70 different training courses from art and cookery to computer and business skills in centres across the country.
You can access training programmes in a variety of ways: in your local centre, with a local employer; or even from the comfort of your own home. All National Learning Network courses are funded through SOLAS or the Health Service Executive and therefore most students receive an allowance for participation.  90% of students who completed a course with us last year went on to further education or training.

NLN Courses
National Learning Network has a wide range of training and further education courses that can open the door to exciting new careers and employment opportunities for you. From business and computer skills, through to graphic design, art and leisure studies, National Learning Network has the course where you can achieve your potential. The courses offer a variety of awards including FETAC (Level 1-6), ECDL, MOS and City & Guilds. National Learning Network facilitates students to recognise previous learning in order to gain a credit towards a full award.

The vocational courses are funded by SOLAS and include the following: Arts, Craft and Media, Catering, Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure, Business Studies and Administration, Computer and IT, Horticulture and Environment, and Career Exploration and Employment.
NLN also offer a large number of rehabilitative training programmes which are designed to assist students in improving the quality of their lives through greater inclusion and involvement with the local community and through learning new skills. The rehabilitative programmes are funded by the HSE.

More Information:
National Learning Network
Roslyn Park College, Sandymount, Dublin 4
Email: rpc@nln.ie
Tel: 01-2613400
Website: www.nln.ie

View NLN courses on Findacourse.ie

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Progress Continues on Apprenticeship Development

apprenticeships in IrelandThe 2017 Call for Apprenticeship Proposals was launched on 04th May 2017 and closed at 17:00 on Friday 01 September.

Generation Apprenticeship is a major expansion project to more than double the number of learners taking the apprenticeship route.

Proposals will be assessed during October 2017. Assessment will be completed by a subgroup of the Apprenticeship Council, overseen by an independent process auditor.

Following assessment and short-listing of the initial proposals it is planned that the assessment subgroup will engage with the short-listed proposers to gather further details including the developmental and operational funding sought for the apprenticeship.

Where similar proposals are received in the same or similar industry areas, the assessment subgroup may convene the groups involved, including industry representatives, to discuss the proposals and to explore whether the apprenticeship proposals should be configured differently.

The engagement process with the short-listed proposers will be completed before formal approval of proposals for apprenticeship development.

It is intended that the outcome of the process will be communicated to all parties by early November 2017.

Information on current apprenticeships is available on www.apprenticeship.ie

In the case of apprenticeships currently in development, 8 of these have occupational profiles which have been formally approved. These occupational profiles are listed below for reference purposes:

  • Baker
  • Butcher
  • HGV Driver
  • ICT Associate Professional Network Engineer
  • ICT Associate Professional Software Developer
  • IFS Advanced Specialist
  • OEM Engineer
  • Telecommunications Field Engineer

For more details on these and other apprenticeship programmes view www.apprenticeship.ie

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