Making New Year Resolutions Work

making new years resolutions workThree of the most common New Year’s resolutions are to get in shape, lose weight, and stop smoking. The most obvious way to do at least two of the above is to start a fitness routine. Typically, fitness classes and gyms are packed full in January and then once March rolls around numbers have dwindled down. But New Year’s resolutions, carefully considered and with the right outlook, can last all year long.

Motivating yourself, persistence, long-term thinking, and getting support are all crucial to making resolutions work. If you consider exercise as boring and painful and something that you should do rather than what you want to do, chances are you won’t be motivated. To get in shape, or to stay in shape requires planning, willpower, discipline, and finding ways to motivate yourself every day. Basically, figure out what will motivate you. If you want to dance, don’t bother lifting weights.

Resolutions may not be easy and probably won’t be smooth sailing (cue the willpower and discipline). Chances are you’ll miss a few workouts, but that’s no reason to give up. Persistence is key and if you can help it, don’t stop. Think long term; resolutions don’t need to be confined by the calendar year so if you want to get fit this year, you’ll probably want to stay fit next year. Finally, ask friends and family members to help you or take a class as opposed to getting fit on your own. Classes can give support in good times and bad and will provide a way of getting fit in a relaxed and enjoyable environment. There are many classes starting in January including yoga, dance, golf, and kickboxing.
new years resolutions - courses
If you want to brush up your golf swing, prepare for next years’ Strictly Come Dancing, or work on your meditation practice, Community Schools may be what you’re looking for. Community schools offer a wide variety of different fitness classes that range from about eight to ten weeks in duration. Malahide Community School offers adult learning courses in golf, belly dancing, salsa dancing, and yoga. In Tallaght, the Old Bawn Community School offers classes in both ballroom and salsa dancing, golf, kick-boxing, and yoga at all levels, yoga for pregnancy, pilates, and tai chi.

Many schools specialise in particular types of fitness including The Dance Theatre of Ireland in Dublin, which has a range of dance classes including latin and ballroom, salsa, and contemporary dance. Courses start at €90 and run for ten weeks from January. If you’re more interested in the downward facing dog than the rumba, there are schools and institutes that specialise in yoga and pilates. AnamYoga in the Limerick, Castleconnell, and Nenagh areas offer a twelve week sivananda yoga course. The Tree of Life, Malahide Holistic Centre provides ashtanga, hatha yoga, and pilates. Other fitness classes can be found at www.findacourse.ie/fitness-health-courses-c5.html.

If you prefer a more academic approach to your health, Kilroy’s College offers a fitness, health, and nutrition distance learning course that allows students to learn how to assess their own fitness level and evaluate their current state of health. Or if you might prefer boosting your personal skills over physical fitness goals then Pitman Training run an assertiveness course in several locations around Ireland.

Resolutions don’t have to be a burden, despite the challenges of discipline, motivation, and persistence increasing fitness can be a great and enjoyable experience that lasts much longer than just a year.